Posts filed under Presentations

Applying economics to the analysis of mergers and vertical restraints

October 2018

Luke Wainscoat gave a lecture on how economics can be applied to assess the effect that mergers and vertical restraints have on competition at the University of Sydney. His lecture sets out some of the economic analysis and techniques that can be used to examine whether a merger will substantially lessen competition.

Luke explained what vertical restraints are, and some of the main anti and pro-competitive effects that they may have on competition, before setting out a mechanism by which the vertical restraints that are likely to substantially lessen competition can be identified. Luke’s presentation is available here.

Posted on October 18, 2018 and filed under Presentations.

The economics of regulation – some examples from Australia

August 2018

Luke Wainscoat gave a lecture on competition policy and how regulation is applied in Australia at the University of Sydney. This lecture is part of an undergraduate course on the economics of regulation. In the lecture Luke provided an introduction to competition policy and regulation before describing how airports, railways and electricity distributors are regulated in Australia. The lecture finished by providing an overview of the access regime in Australia. The slides to the lecture can be found here.

Posted on August 21, 2018 and filed under Presentations.

An example of using data analytics in a competition matter

November 2017

Luke Wainscoat gave a presentation at the Rising Stars Workshop on the use of data analytics in competition matters. His presentation showed how a new and very detailed dataset of financial transactions could be used to help determine the geographic dimension of retail markets. The analysis indicated that the ACCC may have adopted an overly narrow geographic market in a statement of issues regarding a proposed supermarket acquisition. The presentation is available here.

Posted on November 20, 2017 and filed under Presentations.

Applying economics to the analysis of mergers and vertical restraints

October 2017

Luke Wainscoat gave a lecture on how economics can be applied to assess the effect that mergers and vertical restraints have on competition at the school of economics in the University of Sydney. His lecture sets out some of the economic analysis and techniques that can be used to examine whether a merger will substantially lessen competition.

Luke explained what vertical restraints are, and some of the main anti and pro-competitive effects that they may have on competition, before setting out a mechanism by which the vertical restraints that are likely to substantially lessen competition can be identified. Luke’s presentation is available here.

Posted on October 27, 2017 and filed under Presentations.

HSC Economics at Sydney University

August 2017

Ann Whitfield is pleased to be speaking at an upcoming event aimed at high school economics students considering studying economics at university. The event is to be held by the School of Economics at the Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney on Tuesday 5th September from 4pm. Ann is one of several economists who will be speaking at this event, which also includes a hands-on workshop session. For more information on the event, or to register to attend please click here.

Posted on August 21, 2017 and filed under Presentations.

The economics of regulation – some examples from Australia

August 2017

Luke Wainscoat gave a lecture on competition policy and how regulation is applied in Australia at the University of Sydney. This lecture is part of an undergraduate course in the school of economics on the economics of regulation. In the lecture Luke provided an introduction to competition policy and regulation before describing how airports, railways and electricity distributors are regulated in Australia. The lecture finished by providing an overview of the access regime in Australia. The slides to the lecture can be found here.

Posted on August 21, 2017 and filed under Presentations.

The development of electricity consumption

June 2017

Stuart Morrison recently assisted Adrian Kemp in preparing visuals for his talk at Power & Electricity World in Manila last month. Stuart created the chart below showing the relationship between electricity per capita, GDP per capita and total national emissions. The visualisation of this data reveals some interesting trends, including:

  • the momentous rise of electricity consumption per capita in China – especially over neighbouring Malaysia;
  • the decrease in Greece’s GDP per capita from 2009; and
  • the decrease in electricity consumption per capita in Australia – driven by take-up of rooftop solar-PV and more efficient appliances.
Posted on June 20, 2017 and filed under Presentations.

Best paper at the Renewable Energy World Asia 2016 conference in Seoul

November 2016

Ehson Shirazi was invited to prepare a paper for, and present at, the Renewable Energy World Asia 2016 conference in Seoul earlier this year. His paper explores the opportunities created by solar PV and batteries, and specifically how these technologies broaden the policy options available to South East Asian governments for the removal of long standing fuel and electricity subsidies, and hence the transition to a more cost effective and efficient power system.

Ehson showed that if South East Asian governments invested the money that would otherwise be used to fund future electricity subsidies towards the cost of installing renewable generation for customers that would have benefited from those subsidies, then this will reduce the customers’ reliance on thermal generation, and so negate any increase in electricity bills that would occur if the subsidy was not provided. This would then allow the subsidies to be removed far quicker than traditional subsidy rationalisation programmes, with little or no impact on customers. His analysis is supported by an empirical case study from Malaysia.

Ehson was awarded the ‘Best Paper’ award for the renewable energy track at the conference. A copy of his paper and presentation slides can be found here and here.

Posted on November 14, 2016 and filed under Presentations.

Applying economics to the analysis of mergers and vertical restraints

October 2016

Luke Wainscoat gave a lecture on how economics can be applied to assess the effect that mergers and vertical restraints have on competition at the school of economics in the University of Sydney. His lecture sets out what questions economists can help address in order to determine whether a merger is likely to lead to a substantial lessening of competition. It also sets out some of the types of analysis that can be used, and the conditions under which they are appropriate.

Luke explained what vertical restraints are, and some of the main anti and pro-competitive effects that they may have on competition, before setting out a mechanism by which the vertical restraints that are likely to substantially lessen competition can be identified. Luke’s presentation is available here.

Posted on October 6, 2016 and filed under Presentations.

World Smart City Form, Singapore

August 2016

Dr Virginia Wheway recently participated as a World Smart City Community Ambassador, joining a select group of smart-city leaders from government, infrastructure, finance & investment, technology and industry to contribute to the www.WorldSmartCity.com platform and the World Smart City Forum in Singapore on July 13th 2016. The forum was co-located with the World Cities Summit and the Singapore International Water Week. Panellists focussed on the ‘pain points’ hindering  smart city development, as well as the tools - including International Standards - that can help accelerate progress towards smart city goals.

The online platform and discussion boards were designed by the International Electrotechnical Commission in partnership with the United Nations agencies, ISO and ITU. Virginia’s contributions to the discussions initiated and moderated debate on big data and analytics, with particular focus on transport.

Following her participation in Singapore, Virginia has been invited as a keynote speaker at the Smart Cities Expo World Forum event in Sydney December 2016. She will speak on data and analytics relating to urban mobility and transport. More information on the event can be found here.

Posted on August 16, 2016 and filed under Presentations.

Carol Osborne presents at the 2nd Annual Global Competition Law Forum in Japan

August 2016

Carol Osborne was invited to reprise her presentation on the Effects of most favoured nation clauses on competition at this year’s Kluwer Law Conference in Tokyo on 30 June.  Carol’s presentation was originally delivered on 21 April this year at the Hong Kong: 5th Annual Global Competition Law Summit, where she spoke about the theories of harm to competition associated with most favoured nations clauses as well as their potential benefits. She also discussed the empirical tools that are available to assist in the quantification of these effects. Her presentation can be accessed here.

Posted on August 16, 2016 and filed under Presentations.

Virginia Wheway, Guest Lecturer

August 2016

Earlier this year, Virginia Wheway spoke to students at the International Grammar School, as part of the Scientists and Mathematicians in Schools program. She utilised several of her data mining and visualisation techniques, such as this chart, which indicates WaterNSW delivered greater bulk water flows in the summer months, as well as on Sundays. The increase flows on Sundays continue to be observed in the winter months. Visualisation techniques like this one can help conceptualise large amounts of raw data, making the information more accessible. Virginia also frequently guest lectures at tertiary institutions, including the University of Sydney, UTS, UNSW and the University of Wollongong.

Posted on August 16, 2016 and filed under Presentations.

The economics of regulation – some examples from Australia

August 2016

Luke Wainscoat gave a lecture on competition policy and how regulation is applied in Australia at the University of Sydney. This lecture is part of a new unit on the economics of regulation, which is part of the economics program. In the lecture Luke explained what competition policy and regulation are before describing how airports, railways and electricity distributors are regulated in Australia. The lecture finished by providing an overview of the access regime in Australia. The slides to the lecture can be found here.

Posted on August 12, 2016 and filed under Presentations.

Microgrids – into the void

June 2016

Ann Whitfield presented at the ENA Networks 2016 conference in Adelaide.  She spoke about the current lack of a framework for customers ‘to go off grid’, both in cases where the network business has identified that that would be a lower cost solution overall to supplying those customers, and in cases where a group of customers have themselves decided that they would like to form a separate microgrid.  In the absence of a framework, network businesses will be spending above efficient costs, and customer choice in electricity supply risks being frustrated.  Ann’s presentation can be found here.

Posted on June 9, 2016 and filed under Presentations.

Australian Energy Storage Alliance conference in Sydney

June 2016

Ann Whitfield recently presented at a Market Update Briefing held as part of the Australian Energy Storage Alliance conference in Sydney.  Ann spoke to a group of potential investors in the Australian storage sector on the regulatory and institutional arrangements applying in the National Electricity Market, and in particular how the application and development of these arrangements will affect the investment opportunities for both grid-scale storage and behind-the-meter storage.  Ann’s presentation is available here.

 

Posted on June 9, 2016 and filed under Presentations.

Petrol prices in Perth

March 2016

Luke Wainscoat and Sarah Turner have used data provided by Nick de Roos at the University of Sydney to depict the pattern of price changes for retail petrol in Perth, over the decade from 2003 to 2013. This video summarises that dynamic, in the form of a chart that shows:

  • the change in the petrol price from one day to the next (cents per litre) on the vertical axis;
  • the number of days since the beginning of the current petrol price cycle on the horizontal axis, where each cycle is taken to commence when the change in prices across all outlets is positive; and
  • the degree of uniformity of price changes across outlets, with darker shades of red indicating that more petrol stations changed their prices by a given amount on a particular day of the cycle. 

The video highlights that:

  • petrol price cycles occurred frequently from 2003 to mid 2004;
  • price cycles were few and irregular between mid-2004 and early 2006;
  • fortnightly price cycles occurred regularly from mid 2006 to mid 2008; and
  • a weekly price cycle began in early 2009, which became more prominent and regular from 2010.

The paper prepared by Nick de Roos and David Byrne with the same data is here.  

Posted on March 31, 2016 and filed under Presentations.

An introduction to competition economics

March 2016

Luke Wainscoat gave two lectures on an introduction to competition economics to students at the Sydney University Law School as part of its undergraduate course on competition law. The topics Luke discussed were:

  • the demand and supply model;
  • perfect competition vs. monopoly;
  • economic welfare and market power;
  • barriers to entry;
  • game theory;
  • price and quantity setting competition; and
  • collusion and predatory pricing.

Luke’s slides can be found here and here.

Posted on March 10, 2016 and filed under Presentations.

HoustonKemp Seminar Series: Allowed rate of return

November 2015

Recent debate on the allowed rate of return for regulated energy networks has absorbed thousands of pages of service provider, expert and regulator analysis, much of which now sits for decision by the Competition Tribunal. In the first instalment of the HoustonKemp seminars series, our experts Greg Houston, Simon Wheatley, Brendan Quach and Daniel Young, provided a ‘lay person’s review’ of the issues that will drive allowed return outcomes over the coming year. Our speakers’ presentations can be found here.

Posted on November 30, 2015 and filed under Presentations.

The Role of Renewable Generation and Energy Storage in a Diversified Power System

August 2015

Power systems where there has been a large rollout of small scale solar photovoltaics has had a profound impact on grid-sourced electricity consumption and load shapes, with financial implications for existing electricity generators and networks. The prospect of large and small-scale energy storage, which can make renewable generation a technically viable alternative to supplying peak power needs, has the potential to disrupt conventional thinking about the economics of supplying power.

Adrian Kemp presented a paper on the role that renewable generation and energy storage might have in a diversified power system at the Renewable Energy World – Asia conference held in Bangkok. The paper examines the role that renewable generation plays as a hedge against future rises in thermal generation fuel prices, and the value that large-scale energy storage creates when combined with large-scale renewable generation. Adrian’s paper can be found here.

Posted on August 31, 2015 and filed under Presentations.